The Latest

Jul 25, 2014 / 3 notes

Commonwealthcolonizer

The wealth was stolen.

#will still blog about the games though

tjpytheas:

Gay Cabaret, Harare 1995 by Paul Weinberg
Jul 25, 2014 / 44 notes
Me when I find any posts on Southern Africa actually posted by a person of African descent.
#there are so few
#posts not just about wildlife or prince harry or madonna
Jul 25, 2014 / 16 notes

Me when I find any posts on Southern Africa actually posted by a person of African descent.

#there are so few

#posts not just about wildlife or prince harry or madonna

phoweffects:

E X I S T A N T I A L I S M

Basotho ladies. A new favourite blog.
Jul 25, 2014 / 19 notes

phoweffects:

E X I S T A N T I A L I S M

Basotho ladies. A new favourite blog.

Jul 25, 2014 / 567 notes

fckyeahprettyafricans:

Malawi

ig tupo1

Lovely.

kicker-of-elves:

Gaborone Botswana National Geographic December 1990  Photo Peter Essick
Jul 25, 2014 / 127 notes

kicker-of-elves:

Gaborone Botswana National Geographic December 1990  Photo Peter Essick

Jul 25, 2014 / 26 notes

Angola:

Os Detroia - Bela

Say what you want about the dance (which I love but can’t perfect for the life of me), you can’t deny the swag.

Jul 25, 2014 / 5 notes

Malawi:

Martse - Go Deeper

…It started with the song that brought him onto the limelight; “Go Deeper”. In the song, Martse (real name Martin Nkhata) cleverly sampled out the bass guitar from Culture’s classic song titled "I Tried" into his rap song.

"Honestly, I was updating my Facebook statuses and Tweets that I will release a song called "Go Deeper" before I had even made that instrumental. I was really expecting the song to be a success but the level of success it attained even amazed me,” said Martse in an interview with Malawi News Agency.

(Continue reading)

*A current favourite.

Lesotho:
Portrait of a Mosotho shepherd by Marie-Marthe Gagnon
Jul 25, 2014 / 24 notes

Lesotho:

Portrait of a Mosotho shepherd by Marie-Marthe Gagnon

Lesotho/South Africa:
"Tisetse Masoleng, 19, poses for a portrait in an ethnic the Basotho outfit dress traditionally worn by recent initiates into manhood.”
Caption edited from The Telegraph.  Photographer unknown (Reuters)
Jul 25, 2014 / 16 notes

Lesotho/South Africa:

"Tisetse Masoleng, 19, poses for a portrait in an ethnic the Basotho outfit dress traditionally worn by recent initiates into manhood.”

Caption edited from The Telegraph.  Photographer unknown (Reuters)

Madagascar:
Portrait of an elderly Malagasy woman by Stéphane Parnis
Jul 25, 2014 / 13 notes

Madagascar:

Portrait of an elderly Malagasy woman by Stéphane Parnis

The debate is especially frenzied because the racial hierarchy these men were defending when they committed their barbarous acts is still largely intact, even if the lives of many black people have improved since 1994.

T.O. Molefe - “Don’t Free South Africa’s Apartheid Assassins”

(Continue reading)

Jul 25, 2014 / 13 notes
Jul 25, 2014 / 5 notes

nthabilekaota said: Your blog makes me so homesick. I'm from lesotho but live in beijing :)

Thank you for your message!  I’m far from home too so I join you in the homesickness.

Jun 6, 2014 / 26 notes

"There’s a train that comes from Namibia and Malawi. There’s a train that comes from Zambia and Zimbabwe. There’s a train that comes from Angola and Mozambique…from Lesotho, from Botswana, from Swaziland…

iluvsouthernafrica:

The legendary icon, Hugh Masekela - Stimela (live)

From the album: Hope

The power, pain and passion in this song is timeless. Sums up the history of Southern Africa as prescribed by the scramble for minerals.  Hugh Masekela always paid homage to African migrant workers in his music. Legend.

Jun 6, 2014 / 35 notes

Child labour, poverty and Malawi’s Tobacco’s Industry:

According to the International Tobacco Growers Association, transnational tobacco manufacturing and tobacco leaf companies have been collaborating in numerous efforts to oppose global tobacco control. One of their strategies is to stress the economic importance of tobacco to the developing countries that grow it.

Malawi is an extreme example, but not a unique case, of how transnational tobacco companies have used developing countries’ economic dependence to oppose global tobacco regulations. While there is a push for Malawi to diversify crops for economic stability, for now, tobacco will remain the country’s main foreign exchange earner.

Child Labour

At the height of the tobacco harvest season, Malawi's lush, flowing fields are filled with young children picking the big green-yellow leaves. Some can count their age on one hand.

One of them is five-year-old Olofala, who works every day with his parents in rural Kasungu, one of Malawi’s key tobacco growing districts. When asked if he will go to school next year, he shrugs his shoulders.

Since the handling of the leaves is done largely without protective clothing, workers absorb up to 54 milligrams of dissolved nicotine daily through their skin, equal to the amount of 50 cigarettes, according to 2005 research by Prof Robert McKnight, of the College of Public Health at the University of Kentucky, Lexington. Farm owners routinely plead ignorance of the health implications. “I never heard about touching tobacco leaves being dangerous,” says Fraston Mkwantha, who plants 15 hectares of tobacco in Kasungu district.

Poverty

Universal Corporation and Alliance One International, through their subsidiary companies Limbe Leaf and Alliance One, respectively, in Malawi, control policy‐making advisory groups and operate a tobacco cartel to influence Malawi’s economic and trade sectors.  The corporate representative’s presence prevents other committee members from taking positions against the tobacco industry and ensures government policy that advances industry interests to obtain low‐cost tobacco.

These actions restrict competition, depress tobacco prices for Malawi’s farmers and contribute to poverty in Malawi, while keeping the country dependent on tobacco growing.

Sources (1), (2), (3)

Photos from various sources.  No copyright infringement intended.