I LOVE SOUTHERN AFRICA

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(Weekly featured shout-out showing love to another part of the African diaspora)
@SouthRnAfrika

10 Animals That May Go Extinct In The Next 10 Years

So depressing.

— 16 hours ago with 10 notes
#animal extinction  #wildlife conservation  #Human population 
South Africa:
Pantsula dance

South Africa:

Pantsula dance

(via morejoylessannoy)

— 20 hours ago with 22 notes
When someone insists I shorten my African name for their convenience.
Original song

When someone insists I shorten my African name for their convenience.

Original song

— 20 hours ago with 24 notes
#African names  #Black pride  #Zulus  #Zulu names  #South Africa  #Assimilation 
b-sama:

The power of civil society: A concrete Mozambican example
Women’s groups in Mozambique have won a huge battle to prevent some serious anti-women laws from being included in the country’s new penal code – their tenacity is a lesson to us all that ordinary citizens can make change happen.

b-sama:

The power of civil society: A concrete Mozambican example

Women’s groups in Mozambique have won a huge battle to prevent some serious anti-women laws from being included in the country’s new penal code – their tenacity is a lesson to us all that ordinary citizens can make change happen.

— 1 day ago with 21 notes

The Long-tailed Widowbird:

The Long-tailed Widowbird is found in Angola, Botswana, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, South Africa, Swaziland and Zambia. 

The first time I saw this bird was in book when I was a little girl.  We had to create a project and I instantly fell in love with this beauty.  I first witnessed it with my own eyes a little later riding in a packed minicab with my mother traveling from South Africa to Lesotho to attend a funeral in our village. One flew alongside us as though chaperoning us to the pain and heavy freedom of a family burial.  Squashed in between tired mine-workers, city dwellers going home, I fell in love even more. It’s my favourite bird. 

I admit I forgot it was Earth Day today until I came across Dynamic Africa's posts on my Dashboard.  Everyday is Earth Day for us Africans I believe.  Nonetheless, seeing all that natural beauty reminded me of my favourite animals, birds, insects from home.

 Photos from various sources. No copyright infringement intended.

— 1 day ago with 550 notes
#Birds  #African birds  #African wildlife  #Long-tailed widowbird  #African nature 

dynamicafrica:

#EarthDay: Commonly known as the ‘baobab’ tree, the incredibly tall and phenomenally impressive adansonia is a genus of eight species of tree, six native to Madagascar, one native to mainland Africa and the Arabian Peninsula and one to Australia. The mainland African species also occurs on Madagascar, but it is not a native of that island.

Adansonias reach heights of 5 to 30 metres (16 to 98 ft) and have trunk diameters of 7 to 11 metres (23 to 36 ft). Glencoe baobab – an African baobab specimen in Limpopo Province, South Africa, often considered the largest example alive – up to recent times had a circumference of 47 metres (154 ft).

Its diameter is estimated at about 15.9 metres (52 ft). Recently the tree split up into two parts and it is possible that the stoutest tree now is Sunland baobab, also in South Africa. The diameter of this tree is 10.64 m, with an approximate circumference of 33.4 metres.

Some baobabs are reputed to be many thousands of years old, which is difficult to verify, as the wood does not produce annual growth rings, though radiocarbon dating may be able to provide age data.

Baobabs store water inside the swollen trunk (up to 120,000 litres / 32,000 US gallons) to endure the harsh drought conditions particular to each region. All occur in seasonally arid areas, and are deciduous, shedding their leaves during the dry season.

The leaves are commonly used as a leaf vegetable throughout the area of mainland African distribution, including Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and the Sahel. They are eaten both fresh and as a dry powder. In Northern Nigeria, the leaves are locally known as kuka(Hausa), and are used to make Kuka soup (Miyan kuka).

The fruit has a velvety shell and is about the size of a coconut, weighing about 1.44 kilograms (3.2 lb). It has an acidic, tart flavor, described as ‘somewhere between grapefruit, pear, and vanilla’.

The dried fruit powder contains about 12% water and various nutrients, including carbohydrates, dietary fiber, vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, B vitamins, potassium and iron.

In Zimbabwe, the fruit is known as mawuyu in the Shona language and has long been a traditional fruit. According to one source, locals “ate the fruit fresh or crushed the crumbly pulp to stir into porridge and drinks”. Malawi women have already set up commercial ventures earning their children’s school fees for their harvesting work.

(read more)

(via atane)

— 1 day ago with 422 notes

Gaborone, Botswana.  Check tags for more info.

(Source: msafrocanproject)

— 1 day ago with 13 notes
exiledpoetssociety:

Students at National Parliament Building. Gaborone, Botswana
Volz, Stephen

Wonder what year this was.

exiledpoetssociety:

Students at National Parliament Building. Gaborone, Botswana

Volz, Stephen

Wonder what year this was.

— 1 day ago with 118 notes
"The spread of environmentalism may reveal radically different notions about the “rights” and value of plants and animals versus humans. In Madagascar, many intellectuals and officials complain that foreigners seem more concerned about lemurs and other endangered species than about the people of Madagascar (the Malagasy). As a geographer remarked to me, “The next time you come to Madagascar, there’ll be no more Malagasy. All the people will have starved to death, and a lemur will have to meet you at the airport.” Most Malagasy perceive human poverty as a more pressing problem than animal and plant survival."

Conrad Phillip Kottak, Window on Humanity

It’s a tough balance

(via pyroclasticandrea)

Sadly, both the Malagasy people and their wildlife can be taken care of but African animals always take precedence over our people which is sad because both the land and animals belong to us but the world keeps forgetting that.

— 1 day ago with 15 notes
afrikanattire:

Malagasy woman, Madagascar.

afrikanattire:

Malagasy woman, Madagascar.

— 1 day ago with 74 notes
dumbanenguebyceleste:

#check the link of the article entitled #BACKTOTHEROOTS #featuring with @wumburi in #Maputo #Mozambique, photo by #MarceloMauro/ #Mapeople got Style for Real.

dumbanenguebyceleste:

#check the link of the article entitled #BACKTOTHEROOTS #featuring with @wumburi in #Maputo #Mozambique, photo by #MarceloMauro/ #Mapeople got Style for Real.

— 1 day ago with 12 notes
anotherafrica:

Shades of Swagger #41 | Poised and Posed. Portrait of Eduardo Osorio, Editor, Loanda. 

Luanda, Angola. So much swag.

anotherafrica:

Shades of Swagger #41 | Poised and Posed. Portrait of Eduardo Osorio, Editor, Loanda. 

Luanda, Angola. So much swag.

— 1 day ago with 379 notes

South Africa:

New election, same old story for battle-weary villagers

The Mayixhale home in Goso, on the outskirts of Lusikisiki, is only accessible by a rough gravel road. It lies above a small valley that serves as the family’s garden and graveyard.

Goso, to use ANC secretary general Gwede Mantashe’s description of nearby Port St Johns, is “untamed”. This Eastern Cape village has schools and a clinic, but its gravel roads are hard to navigate.

In the Mayixhales’s garden, there are sizable patches of sweet potatoes, taro (amadumbe) and a sprinkling of beans on a slope that runs towards a stream. The family still depends on the stream for water, as was the case when the Mail & Guardian first visited here about 10 years ago. Except for the installation of a prepaid electricity meter, the two-roomed house – painted a pale pink – has not changed since then.

Read more.

Story by Kwanele Sosibo

Photos by Delwyn Verasamy

— 1 day ago with 13 notes
#South Africa  #African elections  #post apartheid  #ANC  #inequality  #Democracy 

Elephants crossing the Zambezi River

Photos derived from various sources. No copyright infringement intended.

— 2 days ago with 114 notes
#Zambezi River  #Elephants  #African wildlife  #African nature  #African rivers