I LOVE SOUTHERN AFRICA

Ask me anything   Submit   Everything to love about ANGOLA, BOTSWANA, LESOTHO, MADAGASCAR, MALAWI, MAURITIUS, MOZAMBIQUE, NAMIBIA, SOUTH AFRICA, SWAZILAND, ZAMBIA & ZIMBABWE

(Weekly featured shout-out showing love to another part of the African diaspora)
@SouthRnAfrika

Zambia:
Portrait of a little girl in Mukini, in Southern Zambia
Photo by: Hayley Anderson

Zambia:

Portrait of a little girl in Mukini, in Southern Zambia

Photo by: Hayley Anderson

— 5 days ago with 37 notes
#Zambia  #Zambians  #african children  #Southern Africa  #African portraits  #Natural hair 

Namibia:

Vintage photos of the Herero celebrating a wedding and with family

— 5 days ago with 20 notes
#Namibia  #Herero  #Namibians  #Vintage Africa  #African wedding  #Southern Africa  #African style 

South Africa:

Vintage portraits of the Xhosa c early 1900s

Photos by AM Duggan-Cronin

— 5 days ago with 489 notes
#Xhosa  #South Africa  #Vintage Africa  #Africa 1900s  #African history  #African beauty  #African portraits  #AM Duggan-Cronin 

Mozambique:

The Nyau Dancers

Nyau (also: Nyao meaning mask or initiation) is a secret society of the Chewa, an ethnic group of the Bantu peoples from Central and Southern Africa.  The Nyau society consists of initiated members of the Chewa and Nyanja people, forming the cosmology or indigenous religion of the people. Initiations are separate for men and for women, with different knowledge learned and with different ritual roles in the society according to gender and seniority. Only initiates are considered to be mature and members of the Nyau.

The word Nyau is not only used for the society itself, but also for the indigenous religious beliefs or cosmology of people who form this society, the ritual dance performances, and the masks used for the dances. Nyau societies operate at the village level, but are part of a wide network of Nyau across the central and part of the southern regions of Malawi, eastern Zambia, western Mozambique and areas where Malawians migrated in Zimbabwe. During performances with the masks women and children often rush into the houses when a Nyau performer threatens, as the masks are worn by only male members of the society and represent male knowledge. At that moment in the performance and rituals, Nyau masked dancers are understood to be spirits of the dead.

Read more.

Photos by Vlad Sokhin

Watch video here.

— 5 days ago with 447 notes
#Mozambique  #Mozambican  #Nyau Dance  #African traditions  #Southern Africa  #Chewa People 

Africa’s Income Inequalities: The reality of a “A Few Big Men” (And women)

Economic inequality has dominated international economic debate recently, and with good reason. Developmental charity organisation Oxfam International made headlines not too long ago with its report which noted that the 85 richest people in the world own the wealth of half of the world`s population.

The report further suggests that this is no accident either, as more often than not; these wealthy elites “co-opt the political process to rig the rules of the economic system in their favour.”

Sub-Saharan Africa sees, nearly 50% of its population live on less than US$1 a day: the world`s highest rate of extreme poverty according to the African Development Bank. What truly drives economic growth is a thriving middle class that spends on goods and services, which in turn stimulates businesses.

This ultimately leads to a robust economy, with solid growth prospects going forward.

Be that as it may, here in Africa, increasingly we are seeing the emergence of an elite obscenely rich section of society; “A few big men” with virtually all control of the economic factors of production. Perhaps unlike in the developed lands of Europe or America, in Africa, usually these wealthy elites have risen to prominence not because of the noble virtues of hard work and innovation.

Of course to be fair, this is a broad generalisation which may not hold true for all the continent`s rich. However evidence would seem to suggest that they have leveraged off their political connections to climb up the economic ladder.

Nowhere else is this fact clearer, than in South Africa which undisputedly, is economically to Africa what America is to the world. Tokyo Sexwale, Cyril Ramaphosa, Mathews Phosa among a host of other ANC ‘cadres’ have emerged to be leaders of the pack; enjoying a greater piece of the economic pie.

Read more.

Photos of:

1. Tokyo Sexwale

2. Cyril Ramaphosa

3. Isabel Dos Santos

— 5 days ago with 7 notes
#South Africa  #Angola  #inequality  #Tokyo Sexwale  #Cyril Ramaphosa  #isabel dos santos  #1% 
"Europeans insist on measuring us with the yardstick that they use for themselves, forgetting that the ravages of life are not the same for all, and that the quest for our own identity is just as arduous and bloody for us as it was for them."

Gabriel García Márquez

RIP

So true for all non-European nations.

— 6 days ago with 16 notes
#Gabriel García Márquez  #Nationalism 
South Africa: 
Mosotho man in traditional clothing
Photo by Danny K

South Africa:

Mosotho man in traditional clothing

Photo by Danny K

— 1 week ago with 12 notes
#Basotho  #Mosotho  #African men  #Basotho Blanket  #African style  #Southern Africa 

Sunday mention: War in the Central African Republic (Full Length Documentary) by ViceNews

I have paused from blogging but had to post this video that helped me better understand the current underreported crisis in the CAR.

I normally do Sunday Shout-outs but I hope you can understand why this is not necessarily a “Shout-out”.  

I also understand that we are all wary when such conflicts are the only stories the world focuses on when it comes to Africa but we can’t ignore when they do occur.  It is imperative that we understand the root of many of these conflicts (read on South Sudan too please) and as always we find that there are many outside forces bent on making sure Africans can never have stable nations.

 

— 1 week ago with 16 notes
#Africa  #Central African Republic  #Civil conflict  #France  #Religion  #christianity in Africa  #Islam in Africa  #Francophone  #French imperialism 
I have found more love, acceptance, inspiration, education and wisdom from the blogs I follow and those that follow me…

…than I have ever had from my own family and I’ll probably never ever meet any of you.

I hear you are all called “Black Tumblr” but I consider you my family.  Thank you.

#notBloggingLatelyButHadToSayThis

— 1 week ago with 14 notes
"

ON Tuesday, Gloria Steinem turns 80.

Do not bother to call. She’s planning to celebrate in Botswana. “I thought: ‘What do I really want to do on my birthday?’ First, get out of Dodge. Second, ride elephants.”

"

Gail Collins: NY Times

Gloria Steinem, there’s much more to do in Botswana like meet the people and find out why (and how) women are faring in one of the most peaceful countries on earth. Secondly, our wild animals are not for your amusement, no matter how famous you may be in America. How about finding out what women in Botswana do (or don’t do) on their 80th birthdays?

Sincerely,

A proud African woman from Southern Africa who’s tired of our wild animals being bothered and our people not being bothered about.

— 1 month ago with 9 notes
An Open Letter to Africa's Leaders - →

b-sama:

I urge our leaders to draw from the lessons of the past, but also to heed current realities. And to look ahead to what the future is calling forth – because this new development agenda will affect the lives of millions of our people at a very critical time for Africa.

I encourage leaders to take a strong stand for fundamental human rights, and advance the trajectory for basic freedoms.

This means pushing for three priorities that lie at the heart of sustainable development: the empowerment of women and gender equality; the rights and empowerment of adolescents and youth; and the sexual and reproductive health and rights of all people.



Read the original article on Theafricareport.com : An Open Letter to Africa’s Leaders - Joaquim Chissano, former President of Mozambique | Soapbox 
Follow us: @theafricareport on Twitter | theafricareport on Facebook

(via fuckyeahmozambique)

— 2 months ago with 16 notes

Sunday Shout-out: Democratic Republic of Congo

Werrason’s dancers take stage.

*The last two ladies, (who also have a solo set with the incredible gentleman) Linda and Bibisia, are my role-models and heroes.  If I could hold court half as well as Bibisia I would be a very content woman.  Sadly, I have not seen them performing with Werrason lately.  Bibisia grew disgruntled with the band and favouritism within the group apparently :-(

Watch an interview of the ladies here. (in Lingala and French)

— 2 months ago with 4 notes
#Werrason  #Democratic Republic of Congo  #Congolese music  #Congolese dancers  #African dancing  #Dancing  #African music