I LOVE SOUTHERN AFRICA

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(Weekly featured shout-out showing love to another part of the African diaspora)
@SouthRnAfrika

Mozambique/Zanzibar:
A man who was to be a slave is “freed” on board HMS Sphinx off the East African coast in about 1907.
The photographs, on display at the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth, Hants, show a sailor removing the manacle from a newly-freed slave African man as well as the ship’s marines escorting captured slavers.
Mr Chidwick, of Dover, Kent, said: “The pictures were taken by my father who was serving aboard HMS Sphinx while on armed patrol off the Zanzibar and Mozambique coast.
“They caught quite a few slavers and those particular slaves Africans that who are in the pictures happened while he was on watch.
Read more on the East African Slave trade here.
*So very, very tough to see this image but here it is.  The original text needed some editing.

Mozambique/Zanzibar:

A man who was to be a slave is “freed” on board HMS Sphinx off the East African coast in about 1907.

The photographs, on display at the Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth, Hants, show a sailor removing the manacle from a newly-freed slave African man as well as the ship’s marines escorting captured slavers.

Mr Chidwick, of Dover, Kent, said: “The pictures were taken by my father who was serving aboard HMS Sphinx while on armed patrol off the Zanzibar and Mozambique coast.

“They caught quite a few slavers and those particular slaves Africans that who are in the pictures happened while he was on watch.

Read more on the East African Slave trade here.

*So very, very tough to see this image but here it is.  The original text needed some editing.

— 2 months ago with 42 notes
#Mozambique  #Zanzibar  #history of slavery  #East African Slave Trade  #Slave trade 
Zimbabwe:
Ndebele warriors, 1905
*Please note, the word Matabele was created by the British  (a spelling that is still common in older texts), “because they found it difficult to pronounce the word amaNdebele”.
Read more about the Northern Ndebele people.

Zimbabwe:

Ndebele warriors, 1905

*Please note, the word Matabele was created by the British (a spelling that is still common in older texts), “because they found it difficult to pronounce the word amaNdebele”.

Read more about the Northern Ndebele people.

— 2 months ago with 106 notes
#Zimbabwe  #Ndebele  #African warriors  #Vintage Africa  #Africa 1900s  #Zimbabweans  #African men  #African history  #British Colonization 

Lesotho:

Profile on marathon runner, Mamorallo Tjoka.

Lesotho’s Olympic and Commonwealth marathon runner Mamorallo Tjoka hopes her country’s landscape can lead to medal success at the games in Glasgow this summer.

— 2 months ago
#Lesotho  #Basotho  #Marathon runners  #runners  #African runners  #African marathons  #Female runners  #African athletes 
protectafrica:

Hippos in Lake Kazuni. The lake is part of Malawi’s Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve. Another excellent photograph by Frank Weitzer (www.ProtectAfrica.org)

Wow.

protectafrica:

Hippos in Lake Kazuni. The lake is part of Malawi’s Vwaza Marsh Wildlife Reserve. Another excellent photograph by Frank Weitzer (www.ProtectAfrica.org)

Wow.

— 2 months ago with 11 notes
"

Are all our self-inflicted stereotypes true or just simply a symptom of some deeper cultural affliction within Zimbabwe that our leaders refuse to discuss?

Are Zimbabwean males and females alike; really more prone to copying other culture identities rather than defining their own? Do we as Zimbabweans really allow ourselves to feed into these over-generalizations?

"

"What type of Zimbabwean stereotype are you?"

Read more.

— 2 months ago with 4 notes
#Zimbabwe  #Zimbabweans  #Stereotypes 
Why Palestinians embrace Mandela more as fighter than peacemaker – for now →
— 2 months ago
#South Africa  #Nelson Mandela  #Palestine  #Palestinians  #israel/palestine  #freedom fighters 
Africans (and everyone else), please stop with misguided theories like:

1.  There was no homosexuality in Africa before Europeans came.

3.  We did not know (or worship) God before the arrival of Europeans.

4.  Colonialism/missionaries forced women’s “liberation” on us.

5.  We had no functioning governments prior to the arrival of Europeans (or Arabs as well really)

6.  Any African person not born in Africa is not a true African/Black person because their culture does not match your learned colonized mentality values.

Stop it.  Please.

— 2 months ago with 124 notes
South Africa:
My mother (left) and a friend pose in their finest on a sunny day in 1970’s Soweto.
*I still cry over her whole wardrobe.  Only a few pieces were salvaged over the years.

South Africa:

My mother (left) and a friend pose in their finest on a sunny day in 1970’s Soweto.

*I still cry over her whole wardrobe.  Only a few pieces were salvaged over the years.

— 2 months ago with 47 notes
#South Africa  #Soweto  #Africa 1970s  #My mother  #African beauty  #African style 
"All too often, these [humanitarian] campaigns are not about the welfare of the people they claim to be helping but act as a platform for celebrities to promote their brand to their audiences at home by exhibiting their humanity."
— 2 months ago with 516 notes

dynamicafrica:

24 years ago today, on February 11th 1990, Nelson Mandela was released from Victor Verster Prison in Paarl.

He had served a total of 27 years behind bars, most of it on the infamous Robben Island, after being convicted of treason during the Rivonia Trial in 1964 for his involvement in Umkhonto we Sizwe - the ANC’s armed wing.

Both before his sentencing and upon his release, Mandela made two iconic speeches. The first, delivered during the Rivonia Trial, lasted three hours. Referred to as the “I Am Prepared to Die" speech, it was inspired by Fidel Castro’s "La historia me absolverá" (History Will Absolve Me) and is considered one of the greatest speeches of the 20th century. 

After his release from prison in Paarl, Mandela delivered another iconic speech that began similarly to Mark Antony’s equally iconic speech in Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”, but with a vastly different message: Friends, Comrades and Fellow South Africans....

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

All Africa, All the time.

Yebo!

— 2 months ago with 327 notes

Namibia:

Himba women

Click on link for more info on hair/jewelry/beauty routines.

Photos by: Matilde Simas

*Please note: I am always very cautious of objectifying our people, especially the Himba, and not perpetuating human zoos.  However, I hope these pics can at least teach us (me at least) the specifics of the detail of Himba beauty routines, styles, adornment  and some of the functions I had not known before.  For eg, that thick, metal ankle bracelets also work to protect against animal bites.  If anything, I admire their styles greatly as they are in line with all diasporic African traditions, from hair to jewelry.

— 2 months ago with 1020 notes
#Himba  #Himba Woman  #African beauty  #Traditional Fashion  #Natural hair 
"We’re at a transition point, and I am a part of a crop of new leaders on the African continent that worry about the people first."

Malawi’s President Joyce Banda

Read more.

— 2 months ago with 52 notes
#Malawi  #President Joyce Banda  #African leaders  #Presidents  #African presidents  #Malawians